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WWII usgi united states military -. WW2 English italian phrase booklet. Cover showing light wear around the edges.

Continental Navy - Wikipedia

Clean pages, good binding. Actual item for sale is shown in photos. Three photos. Hardcover, used, profusely illustrated, there is a list of those Killed in Action in the back. No loose pages. The front cover there is cracks showing up next to the spine as seen in the pics. Published in Pages are not numbered. Has to be a few hundred. When it is available it is expensive. We regret any inconvenience. Lots of great unit photos. Condition is excellent considering their age and where they have been. Guide to Great Britain has notation by soldier. Comes from a pet and smoke free home.

Thanks for looking and God bless you. Condition: Very good for its age. Sustineo Alas. Manuals show normal age and wear and will display nicely. All pages are present and there are no rips or tears. The US military saw the success of German paratroopers in , and quickly set about creating its own elite airborne units.

Good condition, but well used.

101 Facts About The American Civil War

It has 10 pages, this was an insert for the Aviation News magazine. The cover is worn, rip on the back and along the binding. It also has been folded, but still in good condition. This very detailed book with many pictures and diagrams serves as an introductory book for beginning pilots. It has been folded but still remains in excellent condition. Both manuals are in good condition. Many illustrations. Results Pagination - Page 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Men sixteen to forty-five years of age were mandated to serve unless excepted and a long list of exceptions were part of the Act. One new exception was that those who had enlisted or would still enlist into the Connecticut Line of the Army for the term of the present war would be exempt from training after their term was served.

The alarm list was dissolved, but those men under fifty-five had to report on days appointed to view arms. As part of the Act the towns that constituted regiments, and the regiments that constituted brigades, were restated. The 28th Regiment was renumbered the 27th, and in Table 3 above, the 27th Regiment was removed from the 3rd Brigade and the designation of the 28th in the 2nd Brigade was changed to the 27th.

Regiments of Light Dragoons continued as shown in Table 2, but the 26th Regiment and new 27th were not mentioned. When an enlistment expired the men went back into the militia pool. Connecticut had state regiments raised for the defense of the state and an almost constant force defending its seacoast from British incursions. The colonels outlined above, and their staffs, managed the training of their men and the recruitment of men to serve in the Continental, ad-hoc, and state regiments. The first three were edited by J. Hammond Trumbull and fourth through fifteenth by Charles J.

Printer varied by volume.

Naval History and Heritage Command

The first volume appeared in and the fifteenth in The first five, which cover the period of interest, were edited by Charles J. Hoadly volumes and Leonard Woods Labaree volumes These appeared starting in and completed in ; hereafter Colony Records and State Records. Early American Imprints. First Series; no. These names can also be derived from Colony Records volumes 8 through More information is available than presented here.

It should be possible to a list the company officers in each regiment. I have not presented that information here as it is inconsistent and incomplete. Some company officers are associated with a town or ecclesiastical society and some are associated with a company number, making it is difficult to provide a list of companies and their captains, and it is impossible to provide a list of companies in each town.

For my purposes, I would have liked to have presented a list the companies in each town and their respective captains. Officers are appointed in the troops of horse for all regiments except the 17th and 18th regiments which were formed at the May session. The 17th first appointed officers in May Info derived from officer appointments before May The 2nd, 5th, 6th, 7th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 15th, and 16th regiments listed company numbers and I noted the highest company used; the 1st, 3rd, 4th, 8th, 9th, 13th, and 14th regiments used town names or directional labels north, south, middle and my numbers are less exact than those for the first group.

These appointments seem to be related to the troops going to Boston, and not the Militia. The 28th formed in January was redesignated the 27th Regiment by an Act of Assembly in May The 27th formed in January was eliminated in May by the Assembly and thus was no longer part of the 3rd Brigade. Johnston, ed. Johnston does not identify the source in the Trumbull Papers for his information, nor does he indicate whether these papers were in Connecticut or those deposited in the Massachusetts Historical Society.

I have looked through the Trumbull Papers published in the Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society and did not find the document there. Info derived from officer appointments for thru Thank you for this excellent clarifying article. Perhaps it lasted as long as the militia? Fascinating essay, thank you Dr. A summary I have been awaiting for decades. I look forward to pouring over it in detail. He made the trek home, but nothing is recorded of his experience.

Nathan Stoddard, , has an extensive bio, including capture in Quebec and escape via swimming the St Lawrence. Peter Stoddard aries aol. You only find it used in laws and in the appointments of officers. Both of these are activities of the Legislature. So in answer to the question, trainband was used legally in Connecticut throughout the war and into the postwar period, but operationally it appears that only company was used.

I would imagine that use would vary by state. Thank you, Mr. Stewart , concerning the Battle of the Crater which took place on 30 July during the seige of Petersburg. Baugh was a lieutenant in Company G, 61st Virginia Infantry. Original of this letter is located in William Fielding Baugh papers, , accession Letters home, Accession Transcribed by Roy N. Cain in Includes a brief biography in the prologue, a few copies of letters and envelopes, and a photograph of his tombstone in Dinwiddie County, Virginia.

Transcriptions published as Letters Home: Letters of Lt. Baugh CSA Co. G 61st Va. There is an updated 5th printing which contains more letters than located in this collection. Papers, bulk: Baugh records camp news, discusses family matters, and notes efforts to get leaves of absence. He comments on clothing, food, and supplies. Collection include some letters written by family members to Baugh. Most letters are published in Letters Home: Letters of Lt. Baugh Co. Cain 5th printing. The following letters are not in the published volume: Amanda C.

Baugh to William F. Baugh, 25 March ; Amanda C. Baugh, 15 January ; William F. Baugh to Amanda C. Baugh, 19 December ; Virginius N. Baugh, 12 April ; H. Reid to William F. Baugh, 3 October The original of one of the letters dated 4 December is located at the Eleanor S. Bayless, W. Letter, 16 December Letter, 16 December , from W.

Bayless of Company B, 1st Tennessee Infantry, to his mother detailing his regiment's march from home, to Staunton, Virginia, and its final destination of Strasburg, Virginia. He describes Staunton and the surrrounding countryside. Bayless also mentions his plans to move to another regiment.

Baylor, W. Papers, , of W. Baylor of Petersburg, Virginia, consistiong of: a commission, 5 February , as assistant surgeon in the Confederate army from Secretary of War Judah P. Benjamin ; oath of allegiance, 6 April , of W. Baylor; two letters, 7 September and 8 November , from George A. Otis , assistant surgeon-general, to Baylor transmitting abstracts of cases treated at the Confederate hospital in Petersburg during October and June ; and a letter, 20 April , from Charles H.

Military order, 2 September Photostat negative. Special order no. Baylor temporarily relieving him from duty at the Confederate Hospital and reassigning him to other duties immediately. Beadles, George Andrew, Jr. Papers, , Papers, , , of George Andrew Beadles, Jr. Beall, John Bramblett. He also gives a description of Lynchburg, and writes about his duties as an officer, lack of clothing and supplies, and visits with friends and news of fellow soldiers. He requests Merrell to write more, encloses poetry to her, and reminiscences about their time together. Also included is a letter concerning genealogy on the Beall family, as well as an unidentified tintype and a photograph of Beall when he was in his later years.

Bean, Thomas. Reminiscences, no date. Reminiscences, no date, of Thomas Bean b. These reminiscences were apparently dictated to, and written by, an unknown individual. They begin with his capture by Confederate soldiers during the Battle of Weldon Railroad in August , and detail his subsequent imprisonment at Belle Isle and Libby Prisons in Richmond, as well as the military prison at Salisbury, North Carolina. They include details of the searches to which the prisoners were subjected, rations allowed, descriptions of the buildings and grounds, and the conditions which they endured.

A hand-drawn map of Belle Isle prison is also included. Beard also provides information on her family during this time, stating that two brothers served in Company G, 31st Virginia Infantry.


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These recollections first appeared as an article in the Pocahontas Times 4 November Beard, William M. Essays, 26 July Essays, 26 July , written by William M. Beard , Commander-in-Chief of the Sons of Confederate Veterans, and an unidentified author, on religion in the Confederacy. The essays were written in commemoration of the 91st Manassas Battlefield celebration. Topics include support of the Confederacy by various denominations, the suffering endured by their congregations, destruction to their churches, the clergy's loyal oratory and their service in the Confederate army, the spirit of piety in its troops, and the work of Archbishop Jean-Marie Odin , as well as the American Bible Society.

Beauregard, G. File copies of letters and telegrams, , of General G. Also includes an invoice of ordnance and orndance stores. Letter, 19 November Letter, 19 November , from G. Beckley, Alfred. Diary also notes some of the battles that were raging in Richmond, Virginia, Fayette and Raleigh Counties, West Virginia, and includes some personal financial information. Bell, Charles H. Letter, 12 May Letter, 12 May , from Charles H.

Bell b. Bell writes about skirmishing with the enemy and the tactics used by both sides, the surrender of Confederate soldiers, and he describes the scene of thousands of Union troops waiting to cross the Rappahannock River. A transcription of the letter is included. Bell, Miller G. Letter, 3 May Letter, 3 May , from Miller G. Bell ca. Benjamin, Judah P. Letter, 25 March Letter, 25 March , from Judah P.

Benjamin , Richmond, Virginia, to A. Stuart , Staunton, Virginia, requesting that Stuart come to Richmond as soon as possible for a conference with Jefferson Davis Bennett, C. Receipts, 4 March Receipts, 4 March , of Coleman D. Receipt, 4 March Receipt, 4 March , issued by C. Bennett , sheriff of Pittsylvania County, Virginia, for the hire of Ceaser [sic] and Len, slaves of Samuel Hairston for work on fortifications in the department.

Payment ordered by Colonel W. Stevens Bennett, Edgar B. Letter, 13 November Letter, 13 November , from Edgar B. He also notes that General William Sherman has captured Atlanta, Georgia, and is moving towards Charleston, South Carolina, and adds that it is the job of the army in front of Petersburg to occupy Robert E. Lee's army so that it cannot move against Sherman. He adds that he is disappointed in the presidential election. Includes ribbon bits. Bennett, Risden Tyler. Speech, 10 May Berkeley family. Accession , Miscellaneous Reel 2. Papers, , of the Berkeley family of Aldie, Loudoun County, Virginia, containing correspondence pertaining to the following members of the Berkeley family: Lewis Berkeley, his sons, Edmund and William N.

Berkeley, and Francis L. Other correspondents include Thomas Griffin, A. Ramsey, C. Smith, George G. Thompson, P. Thompson, Beverley Tucker, and William Waller. The letters are mostly of a personal nature, discusssing college life, family news, farming, politics, and the Civil War. Berlin, Ira, editor. Records of southern plantations from emancipation to the great migration. Collection consists of papers and records of postbellum tobacco and cotton plantations in North Carolina and Virginia, dating and containing personal and family correspondence, store account books, rental account books, farm ledgers, legal records, cash books, and a diary.

Contains information on the credit system that developed following the war, postbellum store owners and the accounts of freedmen, the Freedmen's Bureau, the southern labor system including African American wage labor, sharecroppers, the African American experience following the Civil War, African American politicians, slavery, abolitionism and abolitionists, and Civil War, Reconstruction and New South politics.

Bernard, D. Order, 2 February Copy of Special Order No. Bernard, George S. Papers, , no date. Papers, and no date, of George S. Bernard of Petersburg, Virginia, consisting of letters, , from Pattie B. Cowles of Petersburg to Bernard while serving in the Petersburg Rifles later Company E, 12th Virginia Infantry stationed in Norfolk, Virginia, describing life in Petersburg in the early days of the Civil War; providing social and family news and gossip; declaring the devotion of the women of Petersburg to the cause and to the men who have left to fight; commenting on Alabama and South Carolina troops which have passed through Petersburg; and stating that President Jefferson Davis passed through Petersburg.

Papers also include an undated speech praising the men and women of the Confederacy and their continuing contributions. Betts, Luther. Papers of Luther Betts of the 9th Virginia Cavalry Regiment, including an order, 6 March , for cavalry detail, and parole, 2 May Beverley, Jane Eliza Carter. Includes information on Civil War action in the surrounding area, and her personal recollections of General Robert E.

Lee These reminiscences were transcribed by Robert Beverley Herbert b. Bevier, Isaac. Letter, 5 July Letter, 5 July , from Isaac Bevier b. He discusses the fighting and a flag that his regiment captured as well as news of camp life, including some souvenirs he and others have picked up. Letter, 15 September Letter, 15 September , from Isaac Bevier of Company E, 44th New York Infantry, to his parents detailing the second battle of Manassas Bull Run , his wounding, and his stay in the hospital including work as a nurse.

He also comments on the campaigning leading up to the battle of Antietam. Also includes a casualty list for the 44th New York.

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Beville, Ella. Notebook, Hardaway d. Bidgood, Joseph Virginius. Black concerning the War of military record of Obadiah Hawkins ca. Billingsly, Joseph. Letters, December Billingsly outlines his military duties, describes the condition of his winter quarters, and discusses the weather.


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Billingsly also tells of washing clothes on Christmas Day and asks about his family. Bills, George. Letter, 27 April Letter, 27 April , from George Bills d. He states that the army is raising breastworks and that sharpshooters fire at anyone who shows his head. Bills writes that soldiers often talk about when they will be heading home and that he expects they will be paid soon. Bills also sends Calvin a power of attorney and some apple tree seeds.

He asks Calvin to send a fine comb because of lice and ticks. There is also a transcript. Binford, William F. Autograph collection, Autograph collection, , of William F. Binford, Jr. Collection contains signatures of prominent Confederate and Union military figures from letters, military records, legal documents, receipts, as well as clipped signatures. Also included is published biographical information for some of the individuals. Binns family. In part, photostats. Papers include birth and marriage information; a list of slaves owned by various family members; a letter from Charles H.

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Binns, Jr. Birdsong, James C. Reminiscences of Civil War service, no date. Reminiscences of Civil War service by James C. Birdsong also mentions his being a prisoner of war. Blackford, Benjamin Lewis. Sketchbook, Accession c. In part photographs and negatives. Sketchbook, , of Benjamin Lewis Blackford of Lynchburg, Virginia, containing sketches of Spotsylvania County, Virginia, the ruins of Chancellorsville, Virginia, soldiers, and other landscapes. Blackford, William Willis. Memoirs: First and Last, or Battles in Virginia. Memoirs of William Willis Blackford entitled "First and Last, or Battles in Virginia," are a typed transcript that detail, chronologically by campaign, the exploits of Blackford while serving as a cavalry officer with the 1st Virginia Cavalry Regiment under Jeb Stuart and as an officer with the Engineer Corps.

These memoirs are very anecdotal, and were published in as War Years With Jeb Stuart reprinted Blackington, R. Letter, 4 November Letter, 4 November , from R.

Blackington of Company I, 20th Maine Infantry, in Culpeper County, Virginia, to his mother Louisa Blackington detailing how the regiment stripped homes for items to use in camp, providing other news, and asking for stockings that he can sell. Blair, Luther R. Parole, 8 May Parole, 8 May , of Luther R.

Fletcher, Danville, Virginia. Blair, William B. Accession x. Letter, 9 June , from William Barrett Blair b. Blaisdell, George. Letter, 26 October Blanchard, Henry T. Letter, 9 November , from Henry T. Blanchard writes about recent battles with the enemy, including those at Brandy Station and Rappahannock Station, as well as the taking of prisoners, the location of various troops, and the cold weather.

Letter, 27 August Letter, 27 August , from Henry T. Blanchard also adds a postscript to his brother. Bland County Va. Bland County, Virginia, Pleas, Board of Military Exemption Minutes and Board of Supervisors Minute Book, bulk , document specific types of records as noted related to county court orders such as the appointments of various Constitutional officers of the county and exemption board rulings, , related to permanent bodily infirmity during the Civil War years when paper was scarce.

Pages for these two sections are not numbered. There are loose papers in this section between pages and Blanvelt, William L. Letter, 28 December Letter, 28 December , from William L. Blanvelt, Lewinsville, Fairfax County, Virginia, to his brother. Topics include a recent battle at Dranesville Fairfax County , weather, Christmas, and views on the war.

The letter was written on letterhead illustrated with a portrait of General McClellan. Bledsoe family. Papers, , of the Bledsoe family of Fentress County, Tennessee; the Hinds family of Barren County, Kentucky; and the Conlee family of Washington County, Illinois; as well as from members of the families who settled in other parts of Tennessee and Kentucky and settled in California and Iowa. Letters consist mainly of social and family news of the three families. Of particular interest are letters, , from William M. Bledsoe to his wife Sarah Hinds Bledsoe b.

Hinds and James M. Bliss, Lyman B. Letter, 16 July Letter, 16 July , from Lyman B. Bliss b. Bliss comments that he was not at the fight because of his health, which he elaborates on. He also mentions his brother Samuel ca. Board, Francis Howard. Letter, 11 February Dearing, and troop movements. Bock, Linda Wilkinson. In part Photocopies. Bock ; Bock and Wilkinson families; William L.

Includes papers of William Fanning Wilkinson concerning the Civil War and his loyalty oath, and papers concerning the Sons of Confederate Veterans. Boggs family. Includes a biographical sketch of Francis Makemie ca. Compiled by Myra Boggs with assistance from Dorothy Bonniwell. Boggs, F. Letter, 31 March Letter, 31 March , from F. Hays Otey , Captain of Otey's Artillery Company, Danville, Virginia, regarding the placement of artillery for the defenses of Danville without Boggs' orders, and that the guns are not to be positioned anywhere until there is a necessity.

Includes a note, 1 April , from Colonel R. Withers , commanding at Danville, stating that he had ordered the guns placed and they could not be moved. Boisseau, Mary Leigh. Abstracts of the proceedings of the Board of Exemption for Pittsylvania County, Virginia, in , compiled by Mary Leigh Boisseau of Danville, Virginia, in , consisting abstracts of the minutes of the Pittsylvania County Board of Exemptions concerning the evaluation of applications of soldiers for discharge from military duty.

Abstracts list the name of the soldier, application disposition approved or rejected , and cause, if approved. There are handwritten corrections made by the compiler. Bolton, James. Medical daybook, Daybook, 24 October January , of James Bolton consisting of a daily record of patients seen, both private and military, often including rank, age, or address. Other sections of the book include more detailed notes of surgery and other treatments, a record of stimulants administered, vaccination procedures and records, and some medicinal preparations.

Bond, Herbert G. Bond and his sister-in-law Julia F. Pierce Bond of Dummerston, Windham County, Vermont, describing camp life, drilling, rations, and picket duty. Bond describes the Virginia countryside, including a description of the Fairfax County court house. He mentions Generals Ambrose Burnside and E. Stoughton , as well the Confederate army.

He also mentions the troops playing baseball. Booth, Cyrus Monroe. Letter, 12 January Letter, 12 January , from Cyrus Monroe Booth of Company E, 27th New York Regiment, to his sister Emma informing her that he is sending her a picture of him, and describing the return to the regiment of 35 men captured at the first battle of Manassas Bull Run. He details the reception for them and sketches how banners and wreaths were hung to celebrate their return. Boothe family. Papers, , of the Booth family of Suffolk, Virginia, consisting of a flyleaf from an undesignated book, ; an invoice, 7 April , for a coffin bought by Nathaniel Boothe, for his wife, in Suffolk, Virginia; and a receipt, 1 May , for items impressed from Boothe by Captain T.

Bosher, Judson S. Collection, Papers, , collected by Mrs. Judson S. Westmore to William D. Clarissa H. Robins for a fee for entering land transferred; a receipt, 8 February [? Gordon to William D. Robins; an agreement, 19 March , Alexander R. Bell, John S. Byers, and Richard H. Dudley with David B. Bell with Harrison T. Bolen, ; a letter, 26 March , from E.

Galt of Lynchburg to "Arthur", commenting on military affairs and discussing local and family news. Bosworth family. Papers, , of the Bosworth family of Randolph County, West Virginia, consisting of letters written to and from Squire Newton Bosworth while he was serving in the 31st Virginia Infantry during the Civil War. There are also letters written to and from his father Dr. Squire Bosworth Subjects of the letters written by Squire Newton Bosworth include his opinions of deserters, news of fellow soldiers and residents of Randolph County, troop movements, and the activities of his father.

Also included in this collection is a forage receipt, as well as poetry written by Squire Bosworth while being held in prison. Papers, , of the Bosworth family of Randolph County, West Virginia, consisting of receipts, , , for J. Barrett of Christian County, Illinois, attacking Bosworth for his Confederate sympathies, this being the letter mentioned by Joshua and Squire Bosworth.

Bosworth, James. Botetourt County Va. Minutes of the Provisional Committee, Most petitions were made on the grounds of permanent bodily infirmity or having furnished a substitute. Most all statements about applications for exemption state the regiment to which the requestor was drafted to serve. Two of the meetings give names of free male negroes who were drafted into the Confederate States Quartermaster department to work on defenses in the New River District or with the Army of South Westerly Virginia.

The final pages of the volume contain information more likely to be found in a court minute or order book and dates from and Barger vs. Polly Barger etc. Botts, John Minor. Cist of Cincinnati, Ohio, containing correspondence stating that James Patton Preston is still alive and living in Montgomery County, Virginia, but that Thomas Mann Randolph is deceased. There are four newspaper clippings on the inside of the letter concerning Botts during the Civil War, when he under suspicion for his Unionist sentiments.

Also includes a portrait of Botts and a brief biographical sketch. Bouldin, William D. Papers, Accession Includes letters written by and to Bouldin while he was being held prisoner at Point Lookout, Maryland, during the Civil War. Majority of the collection is correspondence between him, after he settled in Kentucky, and his sisters, who either remained in Virginia or also moved to Kentucky. Also contained in the collection is information on the 18th Virginia Infantry, including battles fought, numbers of troops involved, killed in action, and wounded, and a list of officers.

Boulware, James Richmond. There are also transcripts of two letters written by Boulware to his brother-in-law William Stokes who had married Eliza Boulware discussing Confederate military activities around Franklin, Virginia, in March , and around Knoxville, Tennessee, in December Bouton, George. Letters, , of George Bouton ca. Collection includes typescript copies. Letters, , from George Bouton ca. Bowden, Henry M. Papers, , of Henry M. Bowden of James City County and Norfolk, Virginia, including accounts, appointments, correspondence, election results, oath of allegiance, and passes.

Most of the letters written by Bowden relate to the hardships he endured by staying loyal to the United States government and his efforts to obtain employment and monetary reparations for lost property. Includes a letter, 31 April , from his daughter, Alice Bowden, regarding life in Williamsburg and attitudes of neighbors towards the family and a statement from Thomas Kemper, , about rental property in Norfolk; a letter, 3 March , from W.

Chase, Secretary of the Treasury, asking for a government appointment; and appointments and letters, , to and from Union general Benjamin F. Butler in which he obtained a post of financial clerk for the Provost Marshal. Also of note is a letter, 11 October , to General Howard from Bowden, asking for reparations for his home and property lost. Bowden, L. Telegram, 8[? United States military telegram, 8[? Telegraph states that Mrs.

5. The American Revolution

Piggot[t], her family, and her slaves have been escorted to Richmond, Virginia. Two or three slaves have escaped to Union lines. Captain Faith may have been Anderson Faith of the 5th Pennsylvania Cavalry, which was stationed in the area. Bowles, John R. Letter, 6 January Letter, 6 January , from John R. Bowles of Company F, 6th Virginia Cavalry, to his mother and sisters living in Baltimore, Maryland, stating that he had been given a furlough to acquire horses for the company and regiment, that he had been able to visit relatives in Botetourt County, Virginia, and sending news of them home.

Bowles comments on the battle of Gettysburg. He also asks how his family and friends in Baltimore are doing and describes some aspects of life as a soldier. Bowling, William H. Letters, , Inkjet and Xerox copies. Letters, and , from Private William H. Letter, 2 August , from Culpeper Court House, Virginia, discusses military rations, a possible furlough, and the progress of the war.